thepeoplesrecord:

9-year-old boy was executed in Chicago: Where is the outrage?August 25, 2014
Antonio Smith, 9 years old, was assassinated the other day.
He was Chicago’s youngest fatal shooting victim this year. He was shot at least four times and fell in a backyard on the South Side.
And when I went out there on 71st and Woodlawn less than 24 hours after he was murdered, here’s what I didn’t see:
I didn’t see protesters waving their hands in the air for network TV cameras. I didn’t see the Revs. Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson playing their usual roles in the political race card game.
I didn’t see white college anarchists hiding behind their white plastic Guy Fawkes masks talking about being oppressed by the state. I didn’t see politicians equivocating. But the worst thing I didn’t see was this:
I didn’t see the theatrical outrage that you see in Ferguson, Mo. A white cop in Ferguson — a place most people never heard of just two weeks ago — shoots a black teenager and the nation knows what to do. The actors scream out their roles on cue.
But in Chicago, a black child is assassinated, and Attorney General Eric Holder isn’t on his way here. There are no hashtag campaigns saying #saveourboys. And instead of loud anger, there is numb silence.
"It’s only the second day. I don’t know what will happen," said Helen Cross, 82, a neighbor who lives down the street from the shooting. She’s lived in the neighborhood for 49 years.
"Everybody says it’s a shame," she said. "It was terrible. But nobody’s … nobody is …"
Her voice trailed off.
Angry?
She nodded.
"A lot of people don’t want to be involved until it happens to their family," said her son, Lewis Cross. "And that’s the shame."
The screamers and the race hustlers buzzing in Ferguson like flies have it easy: White cop/black victim is a script that sells, and the TV cameras come running.
But in Chicago, young African-American and Latino men and boys and girls are shot down far too regularly, by neighbors, meaning other black and Latinos.
Venting outrage at police is easier, and it’s politically advantageous. Venting at neighbors is a bit more complicated and dangerous. The neighbors will still be there on the block long after the columnists and the TV cameras leave. People are afraid. They don’t want their children to pay for anything they might say.
"This city is crazy," said neighbor Arnold Caffey, a mechanic from Detroit. "I mean, Detroit is better than this."
We were sitting on his porch out of the rain.
"A baby has been assassinated, and where’s the anger?" he asked. "When that child was shot, some people out there were still drinking, I’m saying a baby has been assassinated, they’re like, well, they don’t care."
What if the shooter had been police officer — a white police officer?
"You know what would happen, the whole Ferguson thing," Caffey said. "But it’s not."
The Rev. Michael Pfleger, pastor at St. Sabina Roman Catholic Church, has consistently condemned the violence in Chicago. He doesn’t flit in or out of town. He’s always here and was scheduled to lead a neighborhood prayer vigil Thursday evening.
"This 9-year-old boy — in my mind — when you get multiple shots for a 9-year-old boy in a back alley, that’s an execution," he said in a telephone interview before the event. "That’s not a drive-by, that’s not an accident. That sounds like an execution."
He’s been outspoken about Ferguson, but he knows that moral outrage is undercut if there’s silence over the assassination of a child.
"We cannot simply be outraged about something that happens someplace else and get immune to what happens at home," he said. "This is pure evil.
"We have to be absolutely outraged. And we have to say, ‘We’re going to find out who you are, and we’re going to turn you in because you’re not going to get by with this. You can’t kill a 9-year-old kid and go home and eat McDonald’s and watch TV.’"
Antonio Smith was shot in a backyard that borders a railroad viaduct on 71st Street. To the east, the gang that runs things is called Sircon City. To the west, a group called Pocket Town runs the show. Police say he was not a gang member.
Cynthia Smith-Thigpen, a retired Chicago Public Schools teacher, talked about the lack of public outrage.
"There’s shamelessness to the silence over this boy’s death," she said. "It’s like, ‘Oh, another child dead in Chicago.’ Perhaps we’re all numb to what goes on in this city."

In the alley, on hot, rainy afternoon, three men sweated through their suits. They weren’t politicians or cable TV screamers. They were detectives working a heater case.

Out there was a concrete pad where a garage once stood, and thick grass in the yard and bushes around the edges. And there was the rain and the silence in Pocket Town.
I stood off to the side and pictured Antonio in my mind. Was he running? Were his hands raised the way activists said Michael Brown’s hands were raised in Ferguson?
Antonio was a baby. He didn’t allegedly steal cigars or threaten a shopkeeper or punch a cop. He was 9 years old. He was targeted. He was murdered.
"People need to be angry, but this isn’t TV, and some people really don’t care," said neighbor Tony Miller, who has a son about Antonio’s age. "And people who don’t live here don’t want to know, but people get killed all the time."
Source
Antonio’s funeral is scheduled for this Saturday morning. If anyone has any information about any rallies, organizing meetings or any support funds for his family, please feel free to message us. 

thepeoplesrecord:

9-year-old boy was executed in Chicago: Where is the outrage?
August 25, 2014

Antonio Smith, 9 years old, was assassinated the other day.

He was Chicago’s youngest fatal shooting victim this year. He was shot at least four times and fell in a backyard on the South Side.

And when I went out there on 71st and Woodlawn less than 24 hours after he was murdered, here’s what I didn’t see:

I didn’t see protesters waving their hands in the air for network TV cameras. I didn’t see the Revs. Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson playing their usual roles in the political race card game.

I didn’t see white college anarchists hiding behind their white plastic Guy Fawkes masks talking about being oppressed by the state. I didn’t see politicians equivocating. But the worst thing I didn’t see was this:

I didn’t see the theatrical outrage that you see in Ferguson, Mo. A white cop in Ferguson — a place most people never heard of just two weeks ago — shoots a black teenager and the nation knows what to do. The actors scream out their roles on cue.

But in Chicago, a black child is assassinated, and Attorney General Eric Holder isn’t on his way here. There are no hashtag campaigns saying #saveourboys. And instead of loud anger, there is numb silence.

"It’s only the second day. I don’t know what will happen," said Helen Cross, 82, a neighbor who lives down the street from the shooting. She’s lived in the neighborhood for 49 years.

"Everybody says it’s a shame," she said. "It was terrible. But nobody’s … nobody is …"

Her voice trailed off.

Angry?

She nodded.

"A lot of people don’t want to be involved until it happens to their family," said her son, Lewis Cross. "And that’s the shame."

The screamers and the race hustlers buzzing in Ferguson like flies have it easy: White cop/black victim is a script that sells, and the TV cameras come running.

But in Chicago, young African-American and Latino men and boys and girls are shot down far too regularly, by neighbors, meaning other black and Latinos.

Venting outrage at police is easier, and it’s politically advantageous. Venting at neighbors is a bit more complicated and dangerous. The neighbors will still be there on the block long after the columnists and the TV cameras leave. People are afraid. They don’t want their children to pay for anything they might say.

"This city is crazy," said neighbor Arnold Caffey, a mechanic from Detroit. "I mean, Detroit is better than this."

We were sitting on his porch out of the rain.

"A baby has been assassinated, and where’s the anger?" he asked. "When that child was shot, some people out there were still drinking, I’m saying a baby has been assassinated, they’re like, well, they don’t care."

What if the shooter had been police officer — a white police officer?

"You know what would happen, the whole Ferguson thing," Caffey said. "But it’s not."

The Rev. Michael Pfleger, pastor at St. Sabina Roman Catholic Church, has consistently condemned the violence in Chicago. He doesn’t flit in or out of town. He’s always here and was scheduled to lead a neighborhood prayer vigil Thursday evening.

"This 9-year-old boy — in my mind — when you get multiple shots for a 9-year-old boy in a back alley, that’s an execution," he said in a telephone interview before the event. "That’s not a drive-by, that’s not an accident. That sounds like an execution."

He’s been outspoken about Ferguson, but he knows that moral outrage is undercut if there’s silence over the assassination of a child.

"We cannot simply be outraged about something that happens someplace else and get immune to what happens at home," he said. "This is pure evil.

"We have to be absolutely outraged. And we have to say, ‘We’re going to find out who you are, and we’re going to turn you in because you’re not going to get by with this. You can’t kill a 9-year-old kid and go home and eat McDonald’s and watch TV.’"

Antonio Smith was shot in a backyard that borders a railroad viaduct on 71st Street. To the east, the gang that runs things is called Sircon City. To the west, a group called Pocket Town runs the show. Police say he was not a gang member.

Cynthia Smith-Thigpen, a retired Chicago Public Schools teacher, talked about the lack of public outrage.

"There’s shamelessness to the silence over this boy’s death," she said. "It’s like, ‘Oh, another child dead in Chicago.’ Perhaps we’re all numb to what goes on in this city."

Out there was a concrete pad where a garage once stood, and thick grass in the yard and bushes around the edges. And there was the rain and the silence in Pocket Town.

I stood off to the side and pictured Antonio in my mind. Was he running? Were his hands raised the way activists said Michael Brown’s hands were raised in Ferguson?

Antonio was a baby. He didn’t allegedly steal cigars or threaten a shopkeeper or punch a cop. He was 9 years old. He was targeted. He was murdered.

"People need to be angry, but this isn’t TV, and some people really don’t care," said neighbor Tony Miller, who has a son about Antonio’s age. "And people who don’t live here don’t want to know, but people get killed all the time."

Source

Antonio’s funeral is scheduled for this Saturday morning. If anyone has any information about any rallies, organizing meetings or any support funds for his family, please feel free to message us. 

(via whitegirlsaintshit)

whatwhiteswillneverknow:

xxhardcoree:

It’s not about race until you make it.

I heard this before. I remember when people were like “there’s 100 thousand reasons why Hollywood Egypt movies are not suppose to be historical accurate”…

And then the need to be historically accurate suddenly comes up when Broadway decided to put up a Black Cinderella.

So, it’s not about race until sh*t like this happens in your Privileged world…

asker

just-a-simple-pig asked: Before I say this, I agree that white people will probably never know what it's like to experience the type of racism that black people experience. Please know I agree that. But now I just want to say, when you said a dark skinned person can't be racist you said a black person can't judge someone for their skin color (unless I misunderstood what you said my brain's not wired right), which I know is a lie because I have seen black people hate not only whites but Asians and and Native Americans.

whatwhiteswillneverknow:

Black people can be racist… against other Black people when they use White Systemic rules. Any PoC can be racists to other PoC when they use White Systemic beliefs. 

Yes, when I said Black people can’t be racist, that’s not a full statement. Black people can’t be racist to WHITE people. But other races? Yes. Black people can only be prejudice because we don’t have a system in place that can be used as leverage. 

Understand?

P.S. - replace “Black people” with other PoCs and within the last paragraph and it’s still true.

fyeahbadrperpolarbear:

Even worse when they constantly tell you how “great!” you are as the character, then continue to ignore you except when you express that you feel like you are wasting your time.
I’m probably going to submit a story about this fandom as well. 

fyeahbadrperpolarbear:

Even worse when they constantly tell you how “great!” you are as the character, then continue to ignore you except when you express that you feel like you are wasting your time.

I’m probably going to submit a story about this fandom as well. 

fyeahroleplayingrabbit:

Submitted by alias-liam

fyeahroleplayingrabbit:

Submitted by alias-liam

ryulongd:

how come no one’s posted these yet

Jotaro noooo LMAO

(via whitegirlsaintshit)

fishnetsxfros:

I’m sorry, y’all.

I know this is a Black Fashion Blog and nobody here signed up for this tangent kpop post…but I can’t.

I use to love…and I mean LOVE, 2NE1 & Big Bang. I would always argue that YG ENT artists were THE heavy contenders in the kpop biz.

Then a whole lot of cultural appropriation and racist acts later, I threw in the towel. (My last straw was CL coming at me with some fake west side Chola impersonation talking ‘bout, she was worried she wouldn’t be able to get a husband after that video.)

*Le final side eye*

I, like any kpop enjoying person (not living under a rock), heard about 2NE1’s new album release. Wanting to check in on my girl Bom and thinking maybe YG had gotten their shit together, I non begrudgingly watched their live “Crush” video…now wishing I hadn’t.

And wondered who okayed this and why. Who went ahead and decided it’d be the shit to take classically Black hairstyles and make it yet another “quirky/funky” kpop trend?

Who pulled a Moesha on Dara’s head? Who got those packs of Kanekalon and braided each synthetic strand into the poor girl’s possibly already bleach damaged sensitive scalp? Who got the tub of black protein gel and designated toothbrush to slick down her baby hair/edges à la TLC’s Chilli circa 92?

This, alone, doesn’t amount to much offense but added to the already shit ton of things YG has taken from Black Culture, it’s enough.

As a little Black girl, I remember to this day being ridiculed and accosted on a daily basis because of these hairstyles. As a child, I was mocked by teachers and classmates and as an adult I’ve been called “Shaniqua”, “baby mama” and “ghetto fabulous” at work.

Black and Latina women get shamed for wearing these beautiful hairstyles. So no, Yang Hyun-Suk-ssi, you cannot just “ghetto-fy” your artists to urbanize kpop and profit on a culture that’s already bastardized. 

And you know what else you shouldn’t do? Use Black people as props.

I first saw the all Black band in Big Bang’s YG on Air live “Blue” performance, thinking I may just be trippin’ but didn’t put it pass Mr.Yang to pull some shit like an all Black band for possible…I don’t know…proximity swag cred? Well low and behold, the all Black band was rolled out on us again! You’ll find them once more, accompanying 2NE1 in their performance of “Crush”.

We said it most recently to Miley and I’ll say it now to YG ENT; Black people aren’t accessories. And if you don’t understand the implications behind YG’s all Black band…well bless your heart, ‘cause I can’t help you, child.There are just too many receipts available for proof of foul play in regards to YG’s racism on the internet for you not to know what’s up. You either don’t WANT to know or you’re an apologist fangirl/fanboy who will ride or die for their oppas & unnies (and their labels), regardless of whom they trample on.

Now, again, you may think this does not amount to much offense, but on top of Taeyang’s past wannabe light skin racist tomfoolery and GD’s blackface wearing and constant quest towards becoming the Korean incarnation of Snoop Dogg…It’s enough.

My love for music and innovative musicians transcends language and genre…but not racism and cultural appropriation.

YG…get your shit together, please.

-A.

(via offensivekpop)

debating-ur-bullshit:

Saw this on deviantART’s Feminism article and I just

—Nella

  • Quevanzhané Wallis as Annie: YOU'RE RUINING MY CHILDHOOD, ANNIE IS A RED-HEADED WHITE GIRL, NOT SOME GIRL FROM THE "GHETTO" THIS IS STUPID, IM NOT RACIST I SWEAR
  • Rooney Mara as Princess Tiger Lily: Ah yes, she was perfect for the role. What do you mean whitewashing? She is a good actress. Native American women don't try hard enough to go into acting, that's their fault. Make your own movies if that's what you want to see.

loveniaimani:

thatdudeemu:

White people scream race doesn’t matter until someone makes their favorite character black

image

(via blackfangirlsunite)